At the end of 2017, atrocious headlines of sexual harassment and long-overdue public exposés of violated women within different professions shook up the world. Unfortunately nothing new as many might say, but shocking and disturbing anyway. Still, the news challenge people’s fundaments of ancient mindsets regarding the role of women (and men!) in society. But every cloud has a silver lining. The last year has turned out to become a point of inflection for equality and paved the way for a brighter future for women from all around the globe. In times of strained political climates, highly renowned actresses and actors took a stance to empower women. Whether it was on social media or in real life. That is why the attendees wore black at the Golden Globes to support the so-called #MeToo movement.

It seems as there was no better occasion for the first ever Armani/Laboratorio short film, titled “Una Giacca” (“A Jacket” in English), to launch. The storyline is based on two female protagonists who coincidentally share a similar fate. Like a red thread, a simple black menswear jacket by Giorgio Armani connects the life of both women, as well as past and present, color and black and white. Armani himself says: “The jacket represents one of the fundamental elements of my aesthetic, and transforming it into a narrative theme was undoubtedly a challenge.”

With his admiration for cinematography and long-year contribution to film productions designer Giorgio Armani introduced his initiative Armani/Laboratorio back in August 2017, a project the Milanese creative holds very dear, “because cinema has always been [his] true passion.” The workshop, which took place in Armani/Silos, encourages the new generation of film-makers to compete with fellow candidates to get to work with famous industry experts related to the worlds of cinema and fashion. In eight specific areas of expertise – direction, screenwriting, direction of photography, set designing, editing, costume designing, hair and make-up – the newcomers were accompanied by mentors.

Among them were Italian superstars of the world of cinema, for instance screenwriter and writer Francesca Marciano, Oscar-winner costume designer Gabriella Pesucci and Alessandro Lai or Luca Bigazzi, director of photography and record-holder of the David di Donatello price. In total, nine specialists guided and accompanied the students throughout the entire process. The result: a cinematic production of young talents – women and men – who united to create an authentic vision of a more authentic present in which women help women and men help women as well. Brava!